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Bibracte Food

PostPosted: November 28th, 2012, 8:20 am
by Dan Crowther
I came across this http://education.francetv.fr/videos/bourgogne-bibracte-et-sa-cuisine-gauloise-v111271 and it looks quite interesting., especially the different types of food they lave laid out. Unfortunately, I don't speak French. Is there anyone here who can give it a view and comment?

Re: Bibracte Food

PostPosted: November 28th, 2012, 4:03 pm
by Kevin Beckham
Translating it now. It looks really good. a good description of the kitchen itself, not to mention recipies, anecdotes, all broken into the four seasons. The only issue is many ingredients are native to France and hard to get in certain locations.

Re: Bibracte Food

PostPosted: November 28th, 2012, 11:03 pm
by Jeff Scharp


Awesome! In the scene above, she is applying some sort of oil. Can a French-speaker help me out to know what oil or what she is doing here?

Re: Bibracte Food

PostPosted: November 29th, 2012, 9:27 am
by Kevin Beckham
The only oil they mention in the book is hazelnut oil.
I was confused with the link above. I am translating her book about the same subject la cuisine gaulois continue.

Re: Bibracte Food

PostPosted: December 2nd, 2012, 3:00 pm
by Jeff Scharp
Thanks Kevin. That's good. It's even something that's easy to get.

Re: Bibracte Food

PostPosted: July 17th, 2013, 10:05 pm
by Pat Leppan
Are there any sort of "recepies" for any breads or the like from anyones collected information. I have recently purchased several pounds of flax seeds, barley flour, flaxseed meal, and spelt flour and seeds. for starters.

Re: Bibracte Food

PostPosted: July 18th, 2013, 6:41 am
by Edwin Deady
Barley rolls or bannocks are delicious especially if made with part spelt flour to lighten the dough a little., flax seeds and honey instead of sugar in the dough. I base mine on a basic wholemeal flour recipe for rolls. A bit dark and heavy but a meal in themselves. Warning, they may vanish during the day and fellow living historians may be seen guiltily chewing and brushing crumbs off their tunics.

Re: Bibracte Food

PostPosted: March 6th, 2016, 3:56 pm
by Caldou H
Jeff Scharp wrote:
bgk.jpg


Awesome! In the scene above, she is applying some sort of oil. Can a French-speaker help me out to know what oil or what she is doing here?

She says that she doesn't wash her plate often, and she adds that archeologist can now tell if the women used lard, suet or casein.

I may find some time someday to make a full transcript & translation... but not tonight nor this week :)

Re: Bibracte Food

PostPosted: March 7th, 2016, 6:21 pm
by Jeff Scharp
Thanks Caldou! Interesting! Sounds like she has the equivalent of a non-stick plate.