some knives

Forging, smelting, bronze, silver, gold smithing....

some knives

Postby Dave Budd on June 3rd, 2012, 4:52 am

I don't post often, mostly because if I have nothing to say then I don't bother talking *biggrin* But, since I've just finished a few knives for members here I thought I'd stick some pictures up.

First up, a ring hilted combat safe knife. Blade is about 13" long and the whole thing is made from EN45 si-mn spring steel, left with the hammer marks on the surface. The handle is wrapped with leather and the polished ring has been coloured with heat to give a little accent (though the oxides will rub off).

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Next a pair of kitchen knives; large has a blade of about 8". Blades of EN42J high carbon steel, surface has been ground and finished with scrapers and stones (no belt grinders, angle grinders or buffing machines in the Iron Age, so I won't leave those surface finishes! *evil* ). Handles or beech with decoration coloured with ochres.

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Upping the authenticity a little further. This one has a blade of wrought iron and shear steel (made from the same wrought iron and carburised using charcoal and deer poo), about 3" long. The blade has been stone ground to a fine finish then etched gently in vinegar to make the patterns more obvious. Handle is antler with cow horn guard and a slice of serpentine (aka Lizardstone, from Cornwall) pinned inplace with bronze wire.

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And finally, about as close to 100% authentic as is possible without tanning my own leather and smelting my own iron.... This was a commission for Dru on here. The blade is about 4" and the same shear steel and iron as above, but this time (for experimentations sake) I ONLY used tools available during the Iron Age. So it was all forged close to finished dimension/shape, scraped to final shape (files are too expensive to use for stockremoval and a scraper works very well, especially on iron), then stones used to refine the finish and bring to a polish that was etched again in vinegar. The handle is cow horn and antler, the scrimshaw was taken from designs used on harness fittings from 1st Century AD somerset (Polden Hills) and dyed with chracoal and oil. The whole thing is glued together with birch tar. The sheath has been left undyed and the design was drawn on by Dru and I moulded it whilst wet.

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Later in the year I plan to make myself a new knife from iron and steel that I make myself (got the ore, and my own charcoal, just no time), handled with wood from my land and sheathed in some deer hide I've got from a road kill a while back. All because I can *biggrin*
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Re: some knives

Postby Alex Hovorka on June 3rd, 2012, 12:48 pm

That's amazing. I might have to pm you about that wrought iron.
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Re: some knives

Postby Dave Budd on June 6th, 2012, 2:21 am

thanks :) to my mind there is no point doing half a job if you are making something, especially when it comes to authenticity. I get very annoyed when I see reenactors with kit that has been electric welded together or is finished with an angle grinder. They may aswell go out with plastic and foam!
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Re: some knives

Postby mcolbert on June 21st, 2012, 1:55 am

That looks really nice and the simplicity though the obvious ergonomic design is something that would really be appreciated. And in common sense, that would always work hand in hand with what you need done but also everything that would be considered as a part of it.

Nice knives you got there are truly one of the more original collections I have seen recently.
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Re: some knives

Postby Caleb Javier on December 26th, 2012, 3:24 am

nice mate! are you gonna sell one of that?
"All that is your is rightfully mine, and mine it will be." - The Dark Prince kitchen knife sets
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Re: some knives

Postby Dymphy G on December 31st, 2012, 7:08 am

Those knives look fantastic! Unfortunatly, I'm still focussing on getting my first kit together (finally found the right era!), I'm already eyeing on some iron. Maybe late 2013, or in 2014, that I'll buy my first knife and spearhead.
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Re: some knives

Postby Dave Budd on January 4th, 2013, 4:14 am

Caleb, pretty much everything I make I sell (it is how I earn a living afterall!). All of the knives shown here are long gone I'm afraid, but I do take commissions ;)

Dymphy, whenever you need something I'm going to be around making things(hopefully).

I've been meaning to pull my finger out and get more living history stuff made, mostly I make tools for craftspeople and bushcrafty kit. There is a huge cross over, but the general public don't need archaeological accuracy and the renactors are often too tight to pay for it (there are of course exceptions in both camps!). I for one won't make something for living history unless it IS RIGHT, so no short cuts with the angle grinder for finishing or mig welder for joining.
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Re: some knives

Postby Alex Hovorka on October 13th, 2013, 6:10 pm

Is the small kitchen knife based off of a actual Iron Age blade?
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Re: some knives

Postby Dave Budd on December 21st, 2013, 5:45 pm

not specifically, but the general shapes of blades have remaind unchanged since the introduction of iron. There are VERY few blade shapes that are period specific and even they are generally more or less common for a certain date than anything else ;)
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Re: some knives

Postby Dymphy G on December 25th, 2013, 8:19 am

I first need to get a job of course, but what would you recommend to a short, continental female warrior/weaver?
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Re: some knives

Postby Dave Budd on January 7th, 2014, 6:15 am

pretty much any shape would be appropriate. But if I were to make something specifically for a weaver, then it would be short (say 3" or less blade) with a straight edge and not too sharply pointed (spear or drop point). For a warrior, well obviously its not a weapon, so the same or maybe a little larger if also a general purpose blade. Probably a simple wood/antler/bone handle and maybe with some simple decoration carved in if you feel a bit plush and arty, but I probably wouldn't go for multi piece handles and intricae ferrules etc
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